BIBLE STUDY SERIES #491, 492 and 493

22 April, 2001

DEUTERONOMY WARNINGS - PART II

By Douglas C. Nesbit, B.A.

Our series of Bible Studies on the Great Plan by which The Almighty God is steadily drawing His Creation towards the perfection of His Kingdom reveals that this plan centres upon the formation of one selected line of people chronicled in The Scriptural Record, which descends through Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and thence through the whole history of the nation of Israel, and therein to provide, in the person of Jesus Christ, the focal point of His mighty purpose. This series has brought us from the call of Abram in Genesis 12, and the formation of a national entity through which it has pleased Almighty God to work in accomplishing that task, down to Deuteronomy 7, and the prospect of The Promised Land upon the borders of which Israel now stood.

Today we are once again going to be reading from a passage found in Deuteronomy 7, and, as is our custom, we shall be inserting comments which we trust will serve to illuminate the verses as we come to them. The last time we looked at Deuteronomy 7, we read up to verse 11. However, in order to complete our thoughts we should read the verses 6-11 again, in order to refresh in our minds the thoughts which our commentaries had begun to deliver on these Scripture passages in the final great oration by the aged Prophet Moses to the assembled multitudes of the younger generation of Israelites. Moses continues in the words:

6. For thou art an holy people unto the LORD thy God: the LORD thy God hath chosen thee to be a special people unto himself, above all people that are upon the face of the earth.
7. The LORD did not set his love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people; for ye were the fewest of all people:
8. But because the LORD loved you, and because he would keep the oath which he had sworn unto your fathers, hath the LORD brought you out with a mighty hand, and redeemed you out of the house of bondmen, from the hand of Pharaoh king of Egypt.
9. Know therefore that the LORD thy God, he is God, the faithful God, which keepeth covenant and mercy with them that love him and keep his commandments to a thousand generations;
10. And repayeth them that hate him to their face, to destroy them: he will not be slack to him that hateth him, he will repay him to his face.
11. Thou shalt therefore keep the commandments, and the statutes, and the judgments, which I command thee this day, to do them.

At verse 6, The Companion Bible note draws attention to the word "chosen" in the sentence "...thy God hath chosen thee" and states "This is the word emphasized by the Heb. accent ... and it continues "This is the basis of all else that is here stated." It adds "special = peculiar" and it then makes reference to Exodus 19, and explains that "His people" are described as a treasure. At verse 10 it notes, of the word "destroy" that it "= cause them to perish." Moses is very concerned at the probability of failure by future generations of the people to obey these commands of Israel's God, culminating in the injunctions we have just read. As matters eventuated, we realise how those apprehensions came into reality as the years and centuries passed, and how the whole people were first sundered, and later taken off their good land to which they were presently being led. Well intentioned as some might have been at a brave beginning, they were very soon to lose all firmness in the face of practical realities in the land of their inheritance. Moses holds before the people the prospect for success and blessing in what follows, as we see in the passage now unfolding. We again pick up our Scripture at verse 12:

12. Wherefore it shall come to pass, if ye hearken to these judgments, and keep, and do them, that the LORD thy God shall keep unto thee the covenant and the mercy which he sware unto thy fathers:
13. And he will love thee, and bless thee, and multiply thee: he will also bless the fruit of thy womb, and the fruit of thy land, thy corn, and thy wine, and thine oil, the increase of thy kine, and the flocks of thy sheep, in the land which he sware unto thy fathers to give thee.
14. Thou shalt be blessed above all people: there shall not be male or female barren among you, or among your cattle.
15. And the LORD will take away from thee all sickness, and will put none of the evil diseases of Egypt, which thou knowest, upon thee; but will lay them upon all them that hate thee.

This year we have heard and read much concerning the diseases which are afflicting our herds and flocks, and we ought to note that mention of safety from such plagues is assured if Israel, whom we see mainly descended in the generally Anglo-Celto-Saxon and kindred folk today, will obey God's Commandments. It should not take a very wise man to figure out that conversely, plagues upon all our livestock are the permitted outcome when we deny God His rightful honours and exalted place in our national affairs by choosing multicult over Israel's God as our guiding philosophy and by specifically targeting His Ten Commandments for official exclusion from all official public forums holding any governmental connection however tenuous. The humanist, of course, will immediately protest that, in a democratic society like ours, which means a society in which a majority vote decides all issues, including permissible appeal to God's Laws as guidance for the people, we must bow in deference to that majority opinion. Here again, God is answering the protest even before it can be uttered. Hear the next words which Moses speaks to all the people:

16. And thou shalt consume all the people which the LORD thy God shall deliver thee; thine eye shall have no pity upon them: neither shalt thou serve their gods; for that will be a snare unto thee.
17. If thou shalt say in thine heart, These nations are more than I; how can I dispossess them?
18. Thou shalt not be afraid of them: but shalt well remember what the LORD thy God did unto Pharaoh, and unto all Egypt;
19. The great temptations which thine eyes saw, and the signs, and the wonders, and the mighty hand, and the stretched out arm, whereby the LORD thy God brought thee out: so shall the LORD thy God do unto all the people of whom thou art afraid.

We ought also to note this vitally important further extension of the matter: Should Israel's descendants finally feel that they have had enough of such demeaning treatment of Israel's God, and return to honour Him in Spirit and in Truth, God will bring about such calamities against all who oppose His people that they will fear to remove His Commandments, and will greatly fear the consequent repercussions brought upon them by Our LORD, The Almighty God of all the earth if they persist in attempting the overthrow of His National people.

20. Moreover the LORD thy God will send the hornet among them, until they that are left, and hide themselves from thee, be destroyed.
21. Thou shalt not be affrighted at them: for the LORD thy God is among you, a mighty God and terrible.
22. And the LORD thy God will put out those nations before thee by little and little: thou mayest not consume them at once, lest the beasts of the field increase upon thee.
23. But the LORD thy God shall deliver them unto thee, and shall destroy them with a mighty destruction, until they be destroyed.
24. And he shall deliver their kings into thine hand, and thou shalt destroy their name from under heaven: there shall no man be able to stand before thee, until thou have destroyed them.
25. The graven images of their gods shall ye burn with fire: thou shalt not desire the silver or gold that is on them, nor take it unto thee, lest thou be snared therein: for it is an abomination to the LORD thy God.
26. Neither shalt thou bring an abomination into thine house, lest thou be a cursed thing like it: but thou shalt utterly detest it, and thou shalt utterly abhor it; for it is a cursed thing.

Another thought might have been triggered by those words of verse 25. Did you catch them? Let me repeat them for you. "The graven images of their gods shall ye burn with fire: thou shalt not desire the silver or gold that is on them, nor take it unto thee, lest thou be snared therein: for it is an abomination to the LORD thy God." Is that "silver and gold" not the chief characteristic of the Babylonian governmental system which keeps our politicians in fear of losing funds to support their campaigning? The love of such money is the root, as we might say, of all manner of evils, for in our present circumstance, money means power to get people to do what you want them to do. It is a means of manipulation, and a tool of tyranny. It creates a form of pressure system which produces a completely different result from that which develops using the injunction to "love thy neighbour as thyself." One might conceivably use some of that Babylonian money to support laudable ends, but the system is loaded against the average participant. Today, practically all such financial figures are generated as a fraudulent debt even as they come into existence. Such debts require interest to be repaid from the well of past debt, and this puts people further in debt. The mathematics is plain. There is no well of wealth which is not created as a debt. If someone tries to supply such, the money so created is termed "counterfeit" and the suppliers are sentenced in our courts. They have challenged Babylon, and Babylon dare not allow them to succeed! In God's Law Code, all such false systems will be swept away. Debts are to be cleared off the books every seven years, and at every forty-ninth year we come to a Jubilee year which permits people to regain their family heritage and financial stability and assurance, for the land belongs to Our God, and all people are tenants in His Vineyard! May the prospects brighten for you as you meditate on the wonderful covenanted promises of The Almighty God. We shall continue with our Scripture studies next week.

29 April, 2001

DEUTERONOMY 8: WARNINGS - PART III

By Douglas C. Nesbit, B.A.

Our series of Bible Studies on the Great Plan by which The Almighty God is steadily drawing His Creation towards the perfection of His Kingdom reveals that this plan centres upon the formation of one selected line of people chronicled in The Scriptural Record, which descends through Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and thence through the whole history of the nation of Israel, and therein to provide, in the person of Jesus Christ, the focal point of His mighty purpose. This series has brought us from the call of Abram in Genesis 12, and the formation of a national entity through which it has pleased Almighty God to work in accomplishing that task, down to Deuteronomy 8, and the prospect of The Promised Land upon the borders of which Israel now stood.

Today we are reading in Deuteronomy 8, and, as is our custom, we shall be inserting comments which we trust will serve to illuminate the verses as we come to them. In introducing this eighth chapter, The New Bible Commentary notes that: "Moses, as befits his age, calls on them (that is, the Israelites) again to remember ... God's mercies, promises and character ... as a reason for gratitude and obedience."

Deuteronomy 8:1 opens using the phrase "All the commandments", to which The Companion Bible note adds the clarification "= every commandment" which ought to speak to any careless reader a warning that every commandment is valid. James, writing in James 2:10, brings the thought to a similar focus using the words "For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all." These words should draw the attention of any who would seek to avoid any application of the law by using the excuse that as Christ has completed a perfect law-abiding life on our behalf, we are released from any obligation in that direction! It brings to mind the passage in Jeremiah 7:8-10:

8. Behold, ye trust in lying words, that cannot profit.
9. Will ye steal, murder, and commit adultery, and swear falsely, and burn incense unto Baal, and walk after other gods whom ye know not,
10. And come and stand before me in this house, which is called by my name, and say, We are delivered to do all these abominations?

Yet that is what many antinomian preachers would have their flocks to accept.

Further, Moses, using the words "all the way" when speaking of those events which formed relatively recent tribal memories, is asking these younger members of the various tribes of the children of Israel to recall, and in their minds to review, all those many experiences which not only they, themselves, but likewise their parents of the former generation, had encountered, as the tribes took their journey from Egyptian bondage under the mighty acts of Yahweh, the God of all the earth, and the national husband to themselves, in the direction of the forthcoming promised prospect of entry into Their Promised Land. Let us now consider the first verses of Deuteronomy 8 as Moses continues his great oration:

1. All the commandments which I command thee this day shall ye observe to do, that ye may live, and multiply, and go in and possess the land which the LORD sware unto your fathers.
2. And thou shalt remember all the way which the LORD thy God led thee these forty years in the wilderness, to humble thee, and to prove thee, to know what was in thine heart, whether thou wouldest keep his commandments, or no.
3. And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that he might make thee know that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the LORD doth man live.

I ought to note here, before we continue, that the words we have just read were so important that Jesus, having received His baptism in the Jordan river at the hands of John the Baptist, and having then been straightway led of the Spirit into the wilderness for those forty succeeding days of fasting and contemplation prior to embarking upon His ministry, had used them in response to the devil, as recorded in both Matthew 4:1-4 and Luke 4:1-4. You may remember that passage found in Luke's Gospel:

1. And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,
2. Being forty days tempted of the devil. And in those days he did eat nothing: and when they were ended, he afterward hungered.
3. And the devil said unto him, If thou be the Son of God, command this stone that it be made bread.
4. And Jesus answered him, saying, It is written, That man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word of God.

As The Companion Bible notes at verse 2, the number 40 is "The number of probation." Here we see one of those parallel identifications wherein Christ's life during His First Advent reflects the nation's experiences in the national history of His people of Israel. Christ, hungry and under the stress of His forty-day fast, (which was emblematic of those forty years which Israel has experienced in the Wilderness, where they had likewise needed bread and had received the miracle of manna), had there been approached by the devil with three suggestions by way of temptations. He could have met Satan's proposals in order to acquire world dominance. The temptations were real enough, and might achieve His desires for His people immediately, without recourse to The Cross, but they would leave Satan as the prince in charge of this world, and thus would constitute a total defeat of the true plan of Salvation for all humanity, and the Redemption of the nations of Israel.

In this connection, The New Bible Commentary on our Deuteronomy passage points out that, in the Hebrew, "word" does not appear, but that "our Lord supplies it" in Matthew 4:4. The same reference then mentions a rather important point. "When Moses first uttered these words he must have meant by 'every thing that proceedeth out of the mouth of God' the revelation made through him. Christ can have meant no less, thus setting His imprimature upon this book. True life is not to be derived from material things, but from the word of God... ."

The New Bible Commentary carries some thoughts on the words, "he humbled thee" in verse 3. It says: "The wilderness wanderings were a punishment upon the older generation and a humbling experience for those now addressed." Let us again pick up the message being delivered by Moses in Deuteronomy 8 from verse 4:

4. Thy raiment waxed not old upon thee, neither did thy foot swell, these forty years.

The New Bible Commentary notes "Some kind of special divine provision is implied." At the same verse, The Companion Bible notes that raiment is not included in the accounts in Exodus, Leviticus or Numbers but it is confirmed in Nehemiah 9:20-21. At the words "Thy raiment" in verse 4, Keil and Delitzsch carry a more intensive look at the miracle implied by this verse. "As the Lord provided for their nourishment, so did He also in a marvellous way for the clothing of His people during these forty years.." They mention that The Septuagint rendering here is to get hard skin, but they also say that Nehemiah 9:21, that translation to Greek has "their sandals were not worn out" from the parallel passage in Deuteronomy 29:5. They continue "These words affirm something more than 'clothes and shoes never failed you,' inasmuch as ye always had wool, hides, leather, and other kinds of material in sufficient quantities for clothes and shoes." Giving a quotation, they affirm "this would be altogether too trivial a matter by the side of the miraculous supply of manna, and moreover that it is not involved in the expression itself, which rather affirms that their clothes did not wear out upon them, or fall in tatters from their backs, because God gave them a miraculous durability." To further clarify their view, they add "Nor is it necessary to shut out the different natural resources which the people had at their command for providing clothes and sandals, any more than the gift of manna precluded the use of such ordinary provisions as they were able to procure."

5. Thou shalt also consider in thine heart, that, as a man chasteneth his son, so the LORD thy God chasteneth thee.

At verse 5, The Companion Bible notes that the word "chasteneth=correcteth, applicable to instruction as well as chastisement", and supplies several scriptures, among which we might remember Proverbs 3:12: For whom the LORD loveth he correcteth; even as a father the son in whom he delighteth.

6. Therefore thou shalt keep the commandments of the LORD thy God, to walk in his ways, and to fear him.
7. For the LORD thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills;
8. A land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates; a land of oil olive, and honey;
9. A land wherein thou shalt eat bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack any thing in it; a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass.

The New Bible Commentary, at the term "a good land" says "Travellers by the desert route from Egypt tell of the sense of relief on reaching Palestine with its flowery plains, green hills and homely beauty."

The Companion Bible notes of verse 8 that "fig and olive and vine are all mentioned in this verse" to which I would also note the inclusion of pomegranates because of the symbolism which we can connect to each of the four. The vine was the symbol of the Northern House of Israel, the fig of Judah, the pomegranates of Israel's Priesthood, and the olive of all Israel collectively. At verse 9, The Companion Bible says that "hills =mountains." I would add that the Hebrew for "brass" in that verse is "nekosheth", and means copper or bronze. The bronze would be a copper alloy. Keil and Delitzsch give their opinion that the prophesied mineral resources do not seem to have been used by the Israelites, who turned to traders from elsewhere for such supplies. I might insert the comment that modern Israel, consisting mainly of the generally Anglo-Celto-Saxon and kindred peoples, have, in this, their latter-day multitude of nations, the fulfilment of such Godly promises.

We shall continue with our meditations on the succeeding passage in a forthcoming Study.

6 May, 2001

DEUTERONOMY 8: WARNINGS - PART IV

By Douglas C. Nesbit, B.A.

Our series of Bible Studies on the Great Plan by which The Almighty God is steadily drawing His Creation towards the perfection of His Kingdom reveals that this plan centres upon the formation of one selected line of people chronicled in The Scriptural Record, which descends through Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and thence through the whole history of the nation of Israel, and therein to provide, in the person of Jesus Christ, the focal point of His mighty purpose. This series has brought us from the call of Abram in Genesis 12, and the formation of a national entity through which it has pleased Almighty God to work in accomplishing that task, down to Deuteronomy 8, and the prospect of The Promised Land upon the borders of which Israel now stood.

Today we are going to be studying from verse 8, but with 6-7 as a lead into the passage of Deuteronomy 8. As is our custom, we shall be inserting comments as we come to them.

6. Therefore thou shalt keep the commandments of the LORD thy God, to walk in his ways, and to fear him.
7. For the LORD thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths that spring out of valleys and hills;
8. A land of wheat, and barley, and vines, and fig trees, and pomegranates; a land of oil olive, and honey;
9. A land wherein thou shalt eat bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack any thing in it; a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig brass.

The Companion Bible notes of verse 8 that "fig and olive and vine are all mentioned in this verse" to which I would also note the inclusion of pomegranates because of the symbolism which we can connect to each of the four. The vine was the symbol of the Northern House of Israel, the fig of Judah, the pomegranates of Israel's Priesthood, and the olive of all Israel collectively. At verse 9, The Companion Bible says that "hills =mountains." I would add that the Hebrew for "brass" in that verse is "nekosheth", and means copper or bronze. The bronze would be a copper alloy. Keil and Delitzsch give their opinion that the prophesied mineral resources do not seem to have been used by the Israelites, who turned to traders from elsewhere for such supplies. I might insert the comment that such a prophetic picture, while it might not have been applicable in Palestine, could very well, in light of the contention which we of the British-Israel-World Federation make concerning the descent of the generally Anglo-Celto-Saxon and kindred peoples today from those very same Israelites, apply to their latter-day substantial enlargement into the multitude of rich nations which they now inhabit. With that enlarged view, the Godly promises have been more than fully provided to Israel's descendants.

10. When thou hast eaten and art full, then thou shalt bless the LORD thy God for the good land which he hath given thee.
11. Beware that thou forget not the LORD thy God, in not keeping his commandments, and his judgments, and his statutes, which I command thee this day:
12. Lest when thou hast eaten and art full, and hast built goodly houses, and dwelt therein;
13. And when thy herds and thy flocks multiply, and thy silver and thy gold is multiplied, and all that thou hast is multiplied;
14. Then thine heart be lifted up, and thou forget the LORD thy God, which brought thee forth out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage;
15. Who led thee through that great and terrible wilderness, wherein were fiery serpents, and scorpions, and drought, where there was no water; who brought thee forth water out of the rock of flint;
16. Who fed thee in the wilderness with manna, which thy fathers knew not, that he might humble thee, and that he might prove thee, to do thee good at thy latter end;

Regarding that passage through the arid wilderness, containing the poisonous serpents and scorpions, where God brought forth water out of the flinty rock, as it states in verse 16, Keil and Delitzsch lead our attention to those last words, "to do thee good at thy latter end." The people of Israel had been fed with manna in this wilderness to humble and to tempt, or prove them, in order, as the ultimate end of this process, to do them good. They continue "The 'latter end' of anyone 'is the time which follows some distinct point in his life, particularly an important epoch-making point, and which may be regarded as the end by contrast, the time before that epoch being considered as the beginning'. In this instance Moses refers to the period of their life in Canaan, in contrast with which the period of their sojourn in Egypt and their wandering in the desert is regarded as the beginning; consequently the expression does not relate to death as the end of life... . Keil and Delitzsch, however, extend the thought into a long paragraph which imparts a parallel within the personal life experiences of the individual Christian. They conclude the section with the observation that God did not carry forward this purpose because of their own merits, but because of God's covenanted promises to the patriarchs.

17. And thou say in thine heart, My power and the might of mine hand hath gotten me this wealth.
18. But thou shalt remember the LORD thy God: for it is he that giveth thee power to get wealth, that he may establish his covenant which he sware unto thy fathers, as it is this day.
19. And it shall be, if thou do at all forget the LORD thy God, and walk after other gods, and serve them, and worship them, I testify against you this day that ye shall surely perish.
20. As the nations which the LORD destroyeth before your face, so shall ye perish; because ye would not be obedient unto the voice of the LORD your God.

There is, in this last passage a terrible warning not only to those of Israel in that generation which was within hearing of the aged Prophet Moses as he spoke God's words to them in the plain before the Jordan River, but also to every Israelite descendant in every Israel nation even to this present day, for we are only sustained in a congenial relationship with Our Father so long as we remember His Laws, His Judgments and Statutes. If we allow our national governments to corrupt themselves to the point where we no longer can officially read, study and quote God's Laws as the official ethical basis of all our government programmes, then we are in that state described in the passage which has just been read. We have, indeed, forgotten the LORD our God, as a corporate Nation. We have walked after other gods in the act of promoting a policy of multicult egalitarian humanism as the supreme guideline policy in our lands. This is precisely the danger against which Moses was stirred by Yahweh, (Jehovah), The Almighty God, to expound unto God's people of Israel. We have, by the measure which is now blatantly obvious, left our God for the gods which are no gods, and we stand at the present time, in consequence, in line fore that dread supreme word given in verse 19 "I testify against you this day that ye shall surely perish." We need repentance.

Scriptures foretell that Israel will yet inquire of God to do this for them. God speaks through Ezekiel 36, reading from verse 21:

21. But I had pity for mine holy name, which the house of Israel had profaned among the heathen, whither they went.
22. Therefore say unto the house of Israel, Thus saith the Lord GOD; I do not this for your sakes, O house of Israel, but for mine holy name's sake, which ye have profaned among the heathen, whither ye went.
23. And I will sanctify my great name, which was profaned among the heathen, which ye have profaned in the midst of them; and the heathen shall know that I am the LORD, saith the Lord GOD, when I shall be sanctified in you before their eyes.
24. For I will take you from among the heathen, and gather you out of all countries, and will bring you into your own land.
25. Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you, and ye shall be clean: from all your filthiness, and from all your idols, will I cleanse you.
26. A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh.
27. And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes, and ye shall keep my judgments, and do them.
28. And ye shall dwell in the land that I gave to your fathers; and ye shall be my people, and I will be your God.
29. I will also save you from all your uncleannesses: and I will call for the corn, and will increase it, and lay no famine upon you.
30. And I will multiply the fruit of the tree, and the increase of the field, that ye shall receive no more reproach of famine among the heathen.
31. Then shall ye remember your own evil ways, and your doings that were not good, and shall lothe yourselves in your own sight for your iniquities and for your abominations.
32. Not for your sakes do I this, saith the Lord GOD, be it known unto you: be ashamed and confounded for your own ways, O house of Israel.

The verses 37-38 give the summation:

37. Thus saith the Lord GOD; I will yet for this be enquired of by the house of Israel, to do it for them; I will increase them with men like a flock.
38. As the holy flock, as the flock of Jerusalem in her solemn feasts; so shall the waste cities be filled with flocks of men: and they shall know that I am the LORD.

With those words we conclude today's Bible study.

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