BIBLE STUDY SERIES #524, 525 and 526

9 December, 2001

DEUTERONOMY 27:1-10: INSCRIPTION OF THE LAW

By Douglas C. Nesbit, B.A.

Our series of Bible Studies on the Great Plan by which The Almighty God is steadily drawing His Creation towards the perfection of His Kingdom reveals that this plan centres upon the formation of one selected line of people chronicled in The Scriptural Record, which descends through Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and thence through the whole history of the nation of Israel, and therein to provide, in the person of Jesus Christ, the focal point of His mighty purpose. This series has brought us from the call of Abram in Genesis 12, down to today's study in Deuteronomy 27.

With this chapter, we come to a set of chapters which include Deuteronomy 27, 28, 29 and 30, to which Keil and Delitzsch grant the descriptive introductory heading: "III - Third Discourse, or renewal of the Covenant." They explain that the group, taken together, form a passage which they describe thus: "The conclusion of the covenant in the land of Moab, as the last address in this section (chap. xxix. and xxx) is called in the heading (chap. xxviii. 69) and in the introduction (chap. xxix. 9 sqq.), i.e. the renewal of the covenant concluded at Horeb, commences with instructions to set up the law in a solemn manner in the land of Canaan after crossing over the Jordan (chap. xxvii.). After this there follows an elaborate exposition of the blessings and curses which would come upon the people according to their attitude towards the law (chap. xxviii.). And lastly, Moses places the whole nation with a solemn address before the face of the Lord, and sets before it once more the blessing and the curse in powerful and alarming words, with the exhortation to choose the blessing and life (chap. xxix. and xxx.)."

The Companion Bible explains at the start of Chapter 27, on "Sacred Places", that "This is the beginning of the fifth address", obviously making a finer subdivision of the Deuteronomy message.

The New Bible Commentary gives its usual concise attention to this Scripture in verses 1-8 thus: "The narrative form is resumed, the discourse of chapters v - xxvi being completed. Moses now gives a threefold direction about 'this law' just delivered, that it may be more deeply impressed upon the people." Making references to "Moses with the elders", and "the day" which parallel our later commentary sources, they continue in reference to "Great stones", "Many such stelae have been found in Egypt and the East, some inscribed on the stone itself, and some on a surface of cement or lime." Of the words "Thou shalt write" they add "Ancient inscriptions vary greatly in length; one upon the rocks at Behistun is about three times as long as the book of Deuteronomy." They give attention in suitably ambivalent terms to the amount of material constituting the inscription of the law in this case. In reference to Mount Ebal the Commentary notes "The vale, flanked by the twin slopes of Ebal and Gerizim, forms a natural amphitheatre, admirably suited for this occasion. The mountains were visible from the place where these words were spoken." the altar was to be built of natural stones, untouched by any human implement. Burnt offerings symbolize complete consecration and peace offerings communion with God.

Let us now focus in more sharply on today's chapter, Deuteronomy 27. The heading by Keil and Delitzsch is "On The Setting Up of the Law in the Land of Canaan. - Chap. xxvii." and here, they explain "The instructions upon this point are divisible into two: viz. (a) to set up large stones covered with lime upon Mount Ebal, after crossing into Canaan, and to build an alter there for the presentation of burnt-offerings and slain-offerings, and to write the law upon these stones (vers. 1-8); and (b) to proclaim the blessing and curse of the law upon Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal (vers. 11-26). These two instructions are bound together by the command to observe the law (vers. 9 and 10), in which the internal or essential connection of the two is manifested externally also. The fulfilment of these directions after the entrance of Israel into Canaan is described in Josh. viii. 30-35. The act itself had a symbolical meaning. The writing of the law upon stones, which were erected on a mountain in the midst of the land, with the solemn proclamation of blessings and curses, was a practical acknowledgment of the law of the Lord on the part of Israel, - a substantial declaration that they would make the law the rule and standard of their life and conduct in the land which the Lord had given them for an inheritance." Let us now read verses 1 to 10 before commenting in greater detail on that section of the scripture.

1. And Moses with the elders of Israel commanded the people, saying, Keep all the commandments which I command you this day.
2. And it shall be on the day when ye shall pass over Jordan unto the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, that thou shalt set thee up great stones, and plaister them with plaister:
3. And thou shalt write upon them all the words of this law, when thou art passed over, that thou mayest go in unto the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, a land that floweth with milk and honey; as the LORD God of thy fathers hath promised thee.
4. Therefore it shall be when ye be gone over Jordan, that ye shall set up these stones, which I command you this day, in mount Ebal, and thou shalt plaister them with plaister.
5. And there shalt thou build an altar unto the LORD thy God, an altar of stones: thou shalt not lift up any iron tool upon them.
6. Thou shalt build the altar of the LORD thy God of whole stones: and thou shalt offer burnt offerings thereon unto the LORD thy God:
7. And thou shalt offer peace offerings, and shalt eat there, and rejoice before the LORD thy God.
8. And thou shalt write upon the stones all the words of this law very plainly.
9. And Moses and the priests the Levites spake unto all Israel, saying, Take heed, and hearken, O Israel; this day thou art become the people of the LORD thy God.
10. Thou shalt therefore obey the voice of the LORD thy God, and do his commandments and his statutes, which I command thee this day.

At verse 2, The Companion Bible notes "stones: i.e. rough and unhewn. Cp. Ex. 20. 25." Of plaister = gypsum. A hard white cement." In verse 3, the "law" is that law which follows, i.e. the blessings and the curses. The reference to Mount Ebal in verse 4 mentions "The stones, therefore, carried thither from Jordan. Ebal = heaps." At verse 8, the words "very plainly" are followed with the comment "A useful hint for us = plainly and well." Verse 9, "take heed = keep silence, or, take note." "commandments" in verse 10 draws the note "In Hebrew text written singular, but read plural, as here."

As we have noted before, even well-received commentaries do differ from one another in some details, and we might see occasions of this in the passage which comes from Keil and Delitzsch, who say this: "Vers. 1-10. The command in ver. 1 to keep the whole law, ... with which the instructions that follow are introduced, indicates at the very outset the purpose for which the law written upon stones was to be set up in Canaan, namely, as a public testimony that the Israelites who were entering into Canaan possessed in the law their rule and source of life. The command itself is given by Moses, together with the elders, because the latter had to see to the execution of it after Moses' death; on the other hand, the priests are mentioned along with Moses in ver. 9, because it was their special duty to superintend the fulfilment of the commands of God. -Vers. 2 and 3 contain the general instructions; vers. 4-8. more minute details. In the appointment of the time, 'on the day when ye shall pass over Jordan into the land,' etc., the word 'day' must not be pressed, but is to be understood in a broader sense, as signifying the time when Israel should have entered the land and taken possession of it. The stones to be set up were to be covered with lime, or gypsum (whether 'sid' signifies lime or gypsum cannot be determined), and all the words of the law were to be written upon them. The writing, therefore, was not to be cut into the stones and then covered with lime ..., but to be inscribed upon the plaistered stones, as was the custom in Egypt, where the walls of buildings, and even monumental stones, which they were about to paint with figures and hieroglyphics, were first of all covered with a coating of lime or gypsum, and then the figures painted upon this ... . The object of this writing was not to hand down the law in this manner to posterity without alteration, but, as has already been stated, simply to set forth a public acknowledgment of the law on the part of the people, first of all for the sake of the generation which took possession of the land, and for posterity, only so far as this act was recorded in the book of Joshua and thus transmitted to future generations. -Ver. 3. Upon the stones there were to be written 'all the words of this law:' obviously, therefore, not only the blessings and curses in vers. 15-26 ... nor only Deuteronomy ... , since this contained no independent 'second law,' but the whole of the Mosaic law; not, indeed, the entire Pentateuch, with its historical narratives, its geographical, ethnographical, and other notices, but simply the legal part of it,- the commandments, statutes, and rights of the Thorah. But whether all the 613 commandments contained in the Pentateuch, according to the Jewish reckoning ... or only the quintessence of them, with the omission of the numerous repetitions of different commands, cannot be decided, and is of no importance to the matter in hand. The object aimed at would be attained by writing the essential kernel of the whole law; though the possibility of all the commandments being written, of course without the reasons and exhortations connected with them, cannot be denied, since it is not stated how many stones were set up, but simply that large stones were to be taken, which would therefore contain a great deal.

Do keep in mind that we, of the British-Israel-World Federation consistently point out the evidence for the literal genealogical descent of the Anglo-Celto-Saxon and kindred peoples today from the ancient Tribes of those Israel people addressed by Moses so long ago. We shall have to take up the remaining part of the chapter on the next Bible study.

16 December, 2001

DEUTERONOMY 27:11-26: SOLEMN CURSES

By Douglas C. Nesbit, B.A.

Our series of Bible Studies on the Great Plan by which The Almighty God is steadily drawing His Creation towards the perfection of His Kingdom reveals that this plan centres upon the formation of one selected line of people chronicled in The Scriptural Record, which descends through Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and thence through the whole history of the nation of Israel, and therein to provide, in the person of Jesus Christ, the focal point of His mighty purpose. This series has brought us from the call of Abram in Genesis 12, down to today's study in Deuteronomy 27.

With this chapter, the first portion of which we covered on the last Study, we have come to a set of chapters which include Deuteronomy 27, 28, 29 and 30, to which Keil and Delitzsch grant the descriptive introductory heading: "III - Third Discourse, or renewal of the Covenant." Today, we have arrived at Deuteronomy 27:11-26, to which The New Bible Commentary gives the heading "Solemn Curses". The Commentary notes "Moses charges the people (11). Nothing could be more solemn than the cursings of xxvii. 11-26 and the promises and warnings of chapter xxviii." At the words "These shall stand (12)." the commentary says "Jewish commentators say that the priests and Levites first addressed the tribes on Mount Gerizim with the words: 'Blessed is the man ... that maketh not ...' and then those on mount Ebal with the same words, but omitting the negative, and commencing: 'Cursed is the man ...', and that all in turn responded with 'Amen'." Let us read the words of our Scripture starting at verse 11:

11. And Moses charged the people the same day, saying,
12. These shall stand upon mount Gerizim to bless the people, when ye are come over Jordan; Simeon, and Levi, and Judah, and Issachar, and Joseph, and Benjamin:
13. And these shall stand upon mount Ebal to curse; Reuben, Gad, and Asher, and Zebulun, Dan, and Naphtali.
14. And the Levites shall speak, and say unto all the men of Israel with a loud voice,
15. Cursed be the man that maketh any graven or molten image, an abomination unto the LORD, the work of the hands of the craftsman, and putteth it in a secret place. And all the people shall answer and say, Amen.
16. Cursed be he that setteth light by his father or his mother. And all the people shall say, Amen.
17. Cursed be he that removeth his neighbour's landmark. And all the people shall say, Amen.
18. Cursed be he that maketh the blind to wander out of the way. And all the people shall say, Amen.
19. Cursed be he that perverteth the judgment of the stranger, fatherless, and widow. And all the people shall say, Amen.
20. Cursed be he that lieth with his father's wife; because he uncovereth his father's skirt. And all the people shall say, Amen.
21. Cursed be he that lieth with any manner of beast. And all the people shall say, Amen.
22. Cursed be he that lieth with his sister, the daughter of his father, or the daughter of his mother. And all the people shall say, Amen.
23. Cursed be he that lieth with his mother in law. And all the people shall say, Amen.
24. Cursed be he that smiteth his neighbour secretly. And all the people shall say, Amen.
25. Cursed be he that taketh reward to slay an innocent person. And all the people shall say, Amen.
26. Cursed be he that confirmeth not all the words of this law to do them. And all the people shall say, Amen.

The New Bible Commentary again picks up its notes using these words "The tribes chosen for blessing (12) were all descended from Leah or Rachel. Cursed be the man (15). The curses are twelve in number, corresponding to the twelve tribes. The second, fifth and sixth commandments are quoted; the remainder represent grave breaches of honesty or purity. Secretly (24) 'In secret' (RV). Cf. verse 15. The sins are all such as might be perpetrated in secret. The appeal is therefore addressed to the individual conscience. All the people are called upon to condemn such practices openly. All the words of this law (26). Here the people bind themselves, in Eastern fashion, under a curse (cf. Acts xxiii. 12) to keep the whole law, an action repeated under Nehemiah (Ne. x. 29) and cited by Paul (Gal. iii. 10). This curse Christ took upon Himself (Gal. iii. 13), so setting His people free."

The Companion Bible explains at verse 14, "speak, and say" as an idiom meaning the equivalent of the New Testament "answer and say", and the first verb is to be rendered according to the context. Here it means "curse and say."

The New Bible Dictionary, item "Curse" yields some valuable insights. Following introductory points which relate the Hebrew words with Greek equivalents, it explains further. A man may utter a curse, desiring another's hurt, or in confirmation of his own promise, or as a pledge of the truth of his testimony in law. Biblical examples of each are cited. The curse categories when used by God are for denunciation of sin, judgment on sin, and thirdly, the person who is suffering the consequences of sin by the judgment of God is called a curse. However, for the Hebrew, just as a word was not a mere sound on the lips but an agent sent forth, so the spoken curse was an active agent for hurt. Behind the word stands the soul that created it. Thus, a word which is backed by no spiritual capacity of accomplishment is a mere 'word of the lip', but when the soul is powerful the word is clothed in that power. The potency of the word is seen in some of our Lord's healing miracles..., and in His cursing of the barren fig tree. In Zechariah. v. 1-4 the curse, representing the law of God, itself flies through the land, discerns sinners, and purges them out. Writing specifically of our present Scripture, it notes "The rehearsing of the blessings and curses on Mts. Gerizim and Ebal ... reveals the same dynamic view of the curse. On the borders of Canaan, Moses set before the people 'life and death, the blessing and the curse'... . The first national act on entering the land is to set these two in motion: the blessing which will 'overtake' the obedient, and the curse which will 'overtake' the disobedient... . Between these two poles the national life moves. It is because of the relation between obedience and blessing, disobedience and cursing ... that Deuteronomy 29:12 can speak of God's covenant as His 'curse', and Zechariah v. 3 can call the Decalogue the 'curse'. The word of God's grace and the word of God's wrath are the same word: the word which promises life is but a savour of death and judgment to the rebel, and therefore a curse."

Incidentally, I find it interesting that one of the Hebrew words for a curse, "'arar", shows in its pronunciation the English equivalent in our word "error."

Moving to Keil and Delitzsch, we find further assistance. "With the solemn erection of the stones with the law written upon them, Israel was to transfer to the land the blessing and curse of the law, as was already commanded in chap. xi. 29." They discuss the choices of the tribes to stand on each mountain for the blessing and the curse. All the men of Israel were to answer "Amen"; just as in the case of the priestly blessing in Num. v. 22, and in connection with every oath, in which the person swearing took upon himself the oath that was pronounced, by replying "Amen."

"From the passage in Joshua, where the fulfilment of the Mosaic injunctions is recorded, we learn that the Levitical priests stationed themselves in the centre between the two mountains, with the ark of the covenant, and that the people took up their position, on both sides, opposite to the ark, viz. six tribes on Gerizim and six on Ebal. The priests, who stood in the midst, by the ark of the covenant, then pronounced the different formularies of blessing and cursing, to which the six tribes answered 'Amen.' From the expression 'all the men of Israel,' it is perfectly evident that in this particular ceremony the people were not represented by their elders or heads, but were present in the persons of all their adult men who were over twenty years of age; and with this Josh. viii. 33, when rightly interpreted, fully harmonizes."

"In vers. 15-26 there follow twelve curses, answering to the number of the tribes. The first is directed against those who make graven or molten images of Jehovah, and set them up in secret, that is to say, against secret breaches of the second commandment... ; the second against contempt of, or want of reverence towards, parents ...; the third against those who remove boundaries ... ; the fourth against the man who leads the blind astray ... ; the fifth against those who pervert the right of orphans and widows ... ; the sixth against incest with a mother ... ; the seventh against unnatural vices ... ; the eighth and ninth against incest with a sister or a mother-in-law ... ; the tenth against secret murder ... ; the eleventh against judicial murder ('he that taketh reward to slay a soul, namely, innocent blood:' ... ); the twelfth against the man who does not set up the words of this law to do them, who does not make the laws the model and standard of his life and conduct. From this last curse, which applied to every breach of the law, it evidently follows, that the different sins and transgressions already mentioned were only selected by way of examples, and for the most part were such as could easily be concealed from the judicial authorities. At the same time, 'the office of the law is shown in this last utterance, the summing up of all the rest, to have been pre-eminently to proclaim condemnation. Every conscious act of transgression subjects the sinner to the curse of God, from which none but He who has become a curse for us can possibly deliver us' (Gal. iii. 10, 13...)." The explanation is provided that as the curses were chosen by way of examples, there could be chosen examples of corresponding blessings. For example, "Blessed be he who faithfully follows the Lord his God, or loves Him with the heart, who honours his father and his mother," etc.; and lastly, all the blessings of the law could be summed up in the words, "Blessed be he who setteth up the words of this law, to do them."

Do keep in mind that we, of the British-Israel-World Federation consistently point out the evidence for the literal genealogical descent of the Anglo-Celto-Saxon and kindred peoples today from the ancient Tribes of those Israel people addressed by Moses so long ago. We shall have to take up the remaining part of the chapter on the next Bible study.

23 December, 2001

DEUTERONOMY 28: THE IF... CLAUSES (BLESSINGS)

By Douglas C. Nesbit, B.A.

Our series of Bible Studies on the Great Plan by which The Almighty God is steadily drawing His Creation towards the perfection of His Kingdom reveals that this plan centres upon the formation of one selected line of people chronicled in The Scriptural Record, which descends through Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and thence through the whole history of the nation of Israel, and therein to provide, in the person of Jesus Christ, the focal point of His mighty purpose. This series has brought us from the call of Abram in Genesis 12, down to today's study in Deuteronomy 28.

At the time of the year which is marked as Christmas on our calendars, we often quote the Annunciation passage from Luke 1:32-33, wherein the angel Gabriel announced Christ's birth to Mary, and stated "He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David: And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end."

This same Jesus, when He had come to the years of His ministry stated in The Sermon on the Mount "Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil. For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth, pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven: but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven." (Matthew 5:17-19). Thus our present subject matter is an appropriate consideration at Christmas time, as in all other times of the year.

In the last study, which covered the events found in Chapter 27, we had seen how the Tribes of Israel were ordered by God to go to the twin mountains called Gerizim and Ebal, when they had later entered their Promised Land, and there to publicly proclaim the blessings and curses listed in that chapter, which pertained to God's Holy Laws, in a ceremony of the greatest national importance as it would establish God's Law as the law of that land.

Many years later, at the time of Christ's First Advent Ministry, there came an occasion wherein Christ "must needs go through Samaria" (John 4:4). On that occasion, you will remember that Christ had come to the well called Jacob's Well in Sychar, which stood very close to Gerizim and Ebal, at the spot where that great historic gathering of the tribes had indeed, later taken place under Joshua. Christ sat on the well, and there came a woman of the city, in the middle of the day, alone, to draw water. Her marital life, which had included marriages to a succession of five husbands and living with a sixth "who was not her husband", symbolised the then circumstance and condition of the whole of the descendant nation of those tribes of Israel, of Mosaic times which had publicly agreed to the statements of Deuteronomy 27. Curses had indeed come to them for disobedience, but also the blessing was sent of God, in Christ, to this same spot, as He would be the One Who would bring healing, physical and Spiritual, to the people.

Now, with the 28th Chapter of Deuteronomy, we come to the two sets of options, listed in statements laid before the children of Israel, which are of exceptional importance. They are sometimes characterised as the "If" and "But" clauses in God's binding contract with His national wife, the nation of Israel. The "If" clauses are statements of blessings which are to follow compliance with God's Laws, and to flow out to the people therefrom, and the "But" clauses form statements of curses which are to follow if Israel does not comply with these laws.

Let us read a portion of this 28th Chapter which contains the first set of statements that concern blessings for compliance with God's Law. I may, at certain points introduce some comments to underscore the meaning or implications of what is stated.

1. And it shall come to pass, if thou shalt hearken diligently unto the voice of the LORD thy God, to observe and to do all his commandments which I command thee this day, that the LORD thy God will set thee on high above all nations of the earth:
2. And all these blessings shall come on thee, and overtake thee, if thou shalt hearken unto the voice of the LORD thy God.

Keil and Delitzsch point out that this conditional option is stressed thoroughly by Moses, who repeats the statement, not only in the beginning, at verse 2, but also in the middle at verse 9, and again at the end in verses 13 and 14, "in both a positive and a negative form." "All these blessings (those mentioned singly in what follows) will come upon thee and reach thee." "The blessings are represented as actual powers, which follow the footsteps of the nation, and over-take it. In vers. 3-6, the fulness of the blessing of God in all the relations of life is depicted in a sixfold repetition of the word 'blessed'."

3. Blessed shalt thou be in the city, and blessed shalt thou be in the field.
4. Blessed shall be the fruit of thy body, and the fruit of thy ground, and the fruit of thy cattle, the increase of thy kine, and the flocks of thy sheep.
5. Blessed shall be thy basket and thy store.
6. Blessed shalt thou be when thou comest in, and blessed shalt thou be when thou goest out.
7. The LORD shall cause thine enemies that rise up against thee to be smitten before thy face: they shall come out against thee one way, and flee before thee seven ways.
8. The LORD shall command the blessing upon thee in thy storehouses, and in all that thou settest thine hand unto; and he shall bless thee in the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.
9. The LORD shall establish thee an holy people unto himself, as he hath sworn unto thee, if thou shalt keep the commandments of the LORD thy God, and walk in his ways.
10. And all people of the earth shall see that thou art called by the name of the LORD; and they shall be afraid of thee.
11. And the LORD shall make thee plenteous in goods, in the fruit of thy body, and in the fruit of thy cattle, and in the fruit of thy ground, in the land which the LORD sware unto thy fathers to give thee.
12. The LORD shall open unto thee his good treasure, the heaven to give the rain unto thy land in his season, and to bless all the work of thine hand: and thou shalt lend unto many nations, and thou shalt not borrow.
13. And the LORD shall make thee the head, and not the tail; and thou shalt be above only, and thou shalt not be beneath; if that thou hearken unto the commandments of the LORD thy God, which I command thee this day, to observe and to do them:
14. And thou shalt not go aside from any of the words which I command thee this day, to the right hand, or to the left, to go after other gods to serve them.

Keil and Delitzsch continue: "Israel will be blessed in the town and in the field, the two spheres in which its life moves (vers.3); blessed will be the fruit of the body, of the earth, and of the cattle, i.e. in all its productions (vers. 4... ); blessed will be the basket ... in which the fruits are kept, and the kneading-trough ... in which the daily bread is prepared (vers. 5); blessed will the nation be in all its undertakings ("coming in and going out" ...). Vers 7-14 describe the influence and effect of the blessing upon all the circumstances and situations in which the nation might be placed: in vers. 7-10, with reference (a) to the attitude of Israel towards its enemies (vers. 7); (b) to its trade and handicraft (vers. 8); (c) to its attitude towards all the nations of the earth (vers. 9, 10). The operative forms (-of the Hebrew-) (in vers. 7 and 8) are worthy of notice. They show that Moses not only proclaimed the blessing to the people, but desired it for them, because he knew that Israel would not always or perfectly fulfil the condition upon which it was to be bestowed." The thrust of the wording in these passages means "May the Lord be pleased to give thine enemies ... to be smitten before thee (so that they will flee in wild dispersion)", and "May the Lord command the blessing with thee (put it at thy disposal) in thy barns (granaries, store-rooms) and in all thy business." The Commentary continues: "- vers. 9, 10. "The Lord will exalt thee for a holy nation to Himself, ... so that the nations of the earth shall see that the name of Jehovah is named upon thee, and shall fear before thee." and the amplification given is "The Lord had called Israel as a holy nation, when He concluded the covenant with it (Ex. xix. 5, 6). This promise, to which the words 'as He hath sworn unto thee' point back, and which is called an oath, because it was founded upon the promises given to the patriarchs on oath (Gen. xxii. 16), and was given implicite in them, the Lord would fulfil to His people, and cause the holiness and glory of Israel to be so clearly manifested, that all nations should perceive or see 'that the name of the Lord is named upon Israel.' The name of the Lord is the revelation of His glorious nature. It is named upon Israel, when Israel is transformed into the glory of the divine nature ... . It was only in feeble commencements that this blessing was fulfilled upon Israel under the Old Testament; and it is not till the restoration of Israel, which is to take place in the future according to Rom. xi. 25 sqq., that its complete fulfilment will be attained. In vers. 11 and 12, Moses returns to the earthly blessing, for the purpose of unfolding this still further." At verses 13 and 14, the closing comments draw attention to the promise to "make Israel the head and not the tail. and finally they repeat the condition upon which the fulfilment depended."

Do keep in mind that we, of the British-Israel-World Federation consistently point out the evidence for the literal genealogical descent of the Anglo-Celto-Saxon and kindred peoples today from the ancient Tribes of those Israel people addressed by Moses so long ago. If we are beginning to think that God is being unfairly generous in His blessings, we shall be taking up the "Curse" portion of this chapter next, and those verses occupy nearly four times the fourteen verses of blessings thus far studied!

RETURN TO BIBLE STUDY
RETURN TO B.I.W.F. HOME PAGE